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2018 Scrum

This week, the liberal media finally got what it was looking for: the scandalous story that’s going to stop Marco’s momentum.
It’s a 1,644 word bombshell from the Washington Post: When he was 18, Marco got caught in a public park after it closed.
I’m not going to go into the other embarrassing details (because there aren’t any).

The problem: Marco is getting an amazing reception on the trail, but many in the media would rather dig up fake “scandals” like this.
So we’re coming clean about Marco’s other offenses.

Go here to get all the scandalous details:

Marco’s survived $22 million in attacks from the Establishment already, but more is coming.

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“For All The Republican Talk…One Republican Presidential Hopeful Has Actually Done Something…” 

 WASHINGTON, DC – Conservative Solutions PAC, the Super PAC supporting Marco Rubio’s presidential campaign, today released a new television advertisement highlighting steps taken by Marco Rubio to end ObamaCare.  Rubio has saved taxpayers $2.5 billion and threatened the law's long-term survival by ending a bailout of the insurance industry.  The ad, entitled “Some Republicans,” will air in both Iowa and New Hampshire.   To watch the video click here.

 SOME REPUBLICANS”: 

V/O:                On ObamaCare, some Republicans gave up.   

 Some talked tough, but got nowhere. 

 “For all the Republican talk about dismantling the Affordable Care Act, one Republican presidential hopeful has actually done something…” 

(Onscreen: The New York Times, Dec. 9, 2015:  “For all the Republican talk about dismantling the Affordable Care Act, one Republican presidential hopeful has actually done something…”) 

  

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By Governor Doug Ducey

Who says you can't make government work?

We just did it here with the most far-reaching, high-impact education funding bill in our state's history. News like this is too good not to share, so spread the word by forwarding this message along!

We've just passed, signed, and are ready to go with a bill that:
• Puts $3.5 billion into education to dramatically improve our schools.
• Increases per-student funding to $3,600 each year and gives educators the resources they've been asking for.
• Doesn't raise taxes while maintaining our balanced budget.
• Provides relief from lawsuit abuse so funds go into classrooms, not attorneys' pockets.
• Maximizes the State Land Trust by drawing a modest amount as a shrewd investment in our kids.
I'll never forget the good friends and strong, loyal supporters who gave me this job and the accompanying charge to solve problems and get results. Your support was, is, and will always be a source of tremendous inspiration.

Thanks so much,

Governor Doug Ducey

P.S. Help me share our fast-breaking news. Tell your friends, family, neighbors and colleagues that we got something great done for Arizona's future. And we're not done by a long shot. In fact, we're just getting started!

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By Darcy Olsen
President, Goldwater Institute

If sharing the right ideas and principles with our fellow Americans were sufficient, the battle for liberty would have long ago been won. In today’s media age, however, we know that engaging storytelling and strong visual elements are essential to winning hearts and minds. To that end, we redesigned our magazine, Liberty in Action, to appeal to a national audience through storytelling, strong visual elements and narrative voice that inform and inspire readers. With these changes, we are proud to announce that today the Goldwater Institute has won a Gold "Ozzie" Award for Overall Design. The FOLIO: Awards honor the best in editorial (Eddie) and design work (Ozzie) in the magazine publishing industry. The sponsored event is considered the largest awards program of its kind.

This accomplishment is meaningful to us because it means we have successfully reached beyond the “choir” to capture the hearts and minds of Americans of all kinds. With your support, we will continue to send out engaging stories that advance the Freedom movement.

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On Monday, September 21, Coolidge, Ariz. voted on a highly controversial issue: whether or not to limit the prayer before a city council meeting to only Christian prayer. The proposal was unanimously shot down.

When Councilman Rob Hudelson, a pastor for a local Baptist church, brought the topic forth on September 14, the topic was passed into a proposal by a 4 – 2 vote. What happened in one week that a topic, which was once popular, would be unanimously rejected?

Many argued that it was a direct violation of First Amendment rights. The violation in question: If regulating the prayer before a city council meeting is preventing the residents of Coolidge from exercising their freedom of religion? It is quite the opposite.

It is the city council members exercising their own freedom of religion. There is no portion of the First Amendment that speaks specifically towards citizens and that only citizens can exercise this right.

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By Lee Templar
Director of Foundation Relations
The Goldwater Institute

California is poised to become the 25th state that adopts the Right To Try—a law that will help terminally ill patients try promising new medicines pending final approval from the Food and Drug Administration. But Governor Jerry Brown might veto the Right To Try. We need your help to persuade Governor Brown to do what’s best for terminally ill patients who should have the right to fight to save their own lives.

You can call Governor Brown’s office at (916) 445-2841. You can send him an email through this form: https://govnews.ca.gov/gov39mail/mail.php. You can also send him a message on Twitter at @JerryBrownGov and through Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/jerrybrown.

More than 1 million Americans die from diseases each year. They deserve a chance to try the same medicines that a lucky few already are safely using in clinical trials.

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We didn’t start this opinions courtyard years ago to belabor Bob Littlefield, a former Scottsdale City Councilman and failed Republican candidate for the Arizona State Legislature.

But his fodder has just become so rich, or rather so mendacious.

His hypocrisy knows no bounds.

He was for the Desert Discovery Center before he was against it.

He voted for the tallest and densest project in Scottsdale history before proclaiming he’s against such things.

He says he is for the people yet voted with powerful development interests to take away citizen’s rights when they wanted to challenge his supportlittlefield fb post for them.

We could go on.  And on.  And on.  Which is why it’s necessary to write about Littlefield so much.  He’s the ultimate politician.

But his latest campaign deceit may be the most repulsive yet, even worthy of a new nickname:  Lyin’ Bob Littlefield.

We hate to co-opt Donald Trump’s moniker for primary opponent Ted Cruz after his campaign was so dishonest about Ben Carson, but it’s justified.

Just take a look at this social media post from Littlefield on June 29th.

We get exaggeration in political campaigns.  But Littlefield just flat out lied about Scottsdale Mayor Jim Lane on light rail.

Lane has repeatedly voted against light rail plans and proposals his entire time on the Scottsdale City Council and as Mayor.  He even did so just last month.  Lane was in the majority quashing plans for Scottsdale light rail. So how can Littlefield claim otherwise?  Only with a stunning lack of integrity that comes with a flailing campaign.  Littlefield knows better.  He should be better.

His claims about Lane on the proposed Desert Discovery Center are nearly as bad.  Lane supports a public vote on the project.  In fact, this is how he has laid out his position:

Public Needs Final Say On Desert Discovery Center
"The public should decide whether or not the Desert Discovery Center is built on McDowell Sonoran Preserve land and/or use Preserve funds. That’s my position. I want this process to be up front and transparent on this issue because that’s what our residents deserve before the city spends tens of millions of dollars on the project."

If Littlefield’s numerous flip-flops, hypocrisy and anti-business positions (which are almost autarkic) weren’t disqualifying enough, his latest antics surely do the trick.

 

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Former 12-year Scottsdale Councilman and failed state legislative candidate Bob Littlefield sounds more like he’s running for Mayor of Detroit than Scottsdale.

Everything is wrong in our fair city, his wonting bemoans.  And he alone is the guy to fix it.  He, the campaign trailing, self-professing walking combination of Bernie Sanders AND Donald Trump.

We digress in noting the stunning political gymnastics required of someone calling himself cousin to both a redistributionist and repulser of Mexicans, all the while lacking the philosophical consistency of Sanders and the business acumen of Trump.littlefield at desk

Yet, Littlefield waxes ineloquent to his audiences, trust him and utopia is just around the bend.

He’ll stop more development even though he approved the biggest one in Scottsdale’s history.

He’s anti-business now yet ran in 2002 as a pro-development substitute for George Zraket.

He stands for citizens yet took away their rights for a developer.

He’s for the taxpayer except when he’s voting for subsidies and spending on himself and financial backers.

For 12 long years Bob Littlefield sat on the Scottsdale City Council.  From 2003-2015.  Either he’s to blame for the purported problems, or he was wildly ineffective in being able to bring about the change he says is needed.

So, whether he was politically incoherent or a political invalid it certainly suggests he has little to no ability to actually do whatever it is he says he’ll do.  After all,  if a person can’t prove themselves after three Olympiads, there’s little sense in talking about them as captain of next year’s team.

 

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Containment.  Mutually Assured Destruction.  The Domino Theory. Balance of Power.  Trickle Down.  Vouchers.

These are the words of famous philosophies, some more than others, thought to describe the best governance for our schools, economics and foreign affairs. doug little

Here in Arizona a new philosophy by an unexpected voice is noteworthy.  “Gradualism” as proffered by Arizona Corporation Commission Chairman Doug Little, seeks to change state energy policy gradually, not in whole cloths as utility companies are demanding.  They are doing so to both increase profits and deny customers a chance to save when rates rise via solar technology and other means.

Little’s is a voice unanticipated because heretofore he’d been thought to be a marionette of the Arizona Public Service monopoly.  But we can’t think of a better name than Little to espouse a common sense, mature philosophy like Gradualism for the little steps it espouses.

Take the Chairman’s recent approach to a Canadian utility’s attempt to impose “demand charges” in the Arizona territories of Lake Havasu, Kingman and Nogales.  Sure, Little’s rejection of the proposal was a reaction in part to the extraordinary public opposition to the idea that one’s utility bill should be based on the highest use in any one day.  But his approach also seemed to be firmly rooted in the concept of gradualism.  While it’s good to be first in the nation for some if not many things why is it necessary for Arizona consumers to be the laboratory rats for rate hikers, you could almost hear his thinking go.

The Little Doctrine runs contrary to this notion.  It does not forego big ideas – and we would argue demand charges are a bad, big idea – but as the concept goes if major change is to be undertaken it should be phased in so as not to shock the ecosystem. 

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One of the more effective Scottsdale citizen activists in recent years has been downtown business owner Bill Crawford.

He’s taken on some tough fights and special interests and come out the other side.  Most notably he raised problems the surging success of bars and restaurants in the Entertainment District were having on nearby neighborhoods several years ago.  He worked with Mayor Jim Lane and others to enact reforms to alleviate the problems.  The Crawford approach stands in marked contrast to former Councilman Bob Littlefield who has inanely suggested shutting down these small, locally owned businesses rather than be a leader and champion the change Crawford did.

Crawford’s successes are why he took a very hard look at running for Scottsdale Mayor.  He said his primary motivation was to deny Littlefield, who’s also seeking the post versus the well-regarded current Mayor.  But Crawford’s also a realist.  Despite running for the City Council previously Crawford has come up short. He knew that leap-frogging Littlefield, a former 3-term member of the City Council and failed Republican candidate for the Arizona House of Representatives, and into a run-off election would be a tall political order.

So he’s opted to align and endorse Mayor Lane in the upcoming November election.  Lane and Crawford don’t always agree but they share integrity and a commitment to moving Scottsdale forwards, not backwards as Littlefield wants to do.  Crawford and Lane also seem to be aligned on Lane’s call to reform Scottsdale government and create greater City Council representation in the southern part of the city, something Littlefield opposes.

In the end Crawford made the right call for himself, and for Scottsdale.  It’s a big boost for Mayor Lane’s candidacy and surely not the last we’ll be seeing from the conscientious Jack LaLanne of civic thought and leadership.

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By John McCain

My Friend,

Memorial Day is a time of solemn remembrance where we pause to honor the terrible sacrifice made by those who went off to war only to never return.

We remember through ceremony and by celebrating the freedom they fought to defend.

We must never forget what they did in our name. They were family and friends to some, heroes to all - who lived, fought and died for the safety and future of a great and good nation.

Today, Americans are fighting in faraway places most will never see. No matter how remote, no matter how long they are asked to go, it's our duty to remember they have volunteered to be in harm's way to protect us and the ideas and values we hold dear. They deserve our unending gratitude and support.

Click here to watch the video

Every day, I dedicate myself to ensuring that we continue to live in a country that's worthy of their great sacrifices.

Our fighting men and women deserve strong support from their leaders, the best resources and equipment and, most of all, a sound policy and a strategy that give purpose to their actions and return them home with speed and safety.

May God bless them, may we never forget, and may God bless America.

Sincerely,

John McCain

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With State Senator Adam Driggs retiring two seats are up for grabs in the upcoming race for the Arizona House of Representatives in Legislative District 28. That’s because a current holder of one of those seats, Kate Brophy McGee, is running to replace Driggs as is the other State Representative, Eric Meyer, a doctor.

The House calls for their replacements are easy ones to make, both Republicans.

First up is well-regarded Paradise Valley Councilwoman Mary Hamway.  Her brand of character and communication is exactly what you want to have in the political arena.  She has consistently been a pro-tourism, pro-resort vote on her Town Council including the landmark decision to bring Mountain Shadows back to life as well as bringing the Ritz-Carlton to the community, a move that secures the town’s financial future.  We don’t always agree with Hamway.  Indeed, she’s rigid on preventing a medical marijuana dispensary in Paradise Valley even though it’s the law of the land and public support for the policy continues to increase since the measure’s narrow passage in 2010.  But her position shows spine.  And that’s something she and Arizona will need as the special interests come calling at the State Capitol.  Hamway narrowly lost her 2014 race for the same seat she is pursuing now.  We don’t expect the same outcome.  Indeed, Arizona would be the biggest loser were that to be the case. 

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Friends was one of the best and most successful television comedies of all time.  No one can say it didn’t have a great run.  From Phoebe Buffay to Chandler Bing the characters became a staple of American life.

Chandler, Arizona has also had a great run.  It is among Arizona’s most successful cities.  From Jay Tibshraeny to Jack Sellers it has been led by Mayors and members of the City Council who have largely made effective policy decisions.

385848 04: Actor Matthew Perry stars as Chandler Bing in NBC's comedy series "Friends." (Photo by Warner Bros. Television)

But just as Matthew Perry seemed askew in roles post-Friends so too was it odd to see stories like this one last year in which a well-connected developer and lobbyist conspired to sink a business’ aspirations in the Price Road Corridor. In any entitlement case there are typically good reasons to approve or reject an application but in this case the political games engineered by a nearby developer merely sinking to quash competition seemed more reminiscent of the dark hallways at the Arizona State Legislature than the home of Intel.

Fortunately, Chandler has a chance Thursday night to indicate it still is a city that’s headed in the right direction and that it rises above the politics of self-interest for the community interest.

On Thursday, a $500 million expansion of a successful, existing business park is on the docket.  Behind the scenes the same actors of a nearby, subsidized office building are again trying to undermine a competitor.  But this time they’re not just picking on an aspiring Korean businesswoman.  They are playing with fire.  For the project is quietly being considered by Fortune 500 companies surveying the Valley for new digs.  And speaking of surveys word is that one over the weekend of likely Chandler voters showed a whopping 85%-7% support for the project that could bring as many as 15,000 jobs and millions in new tax revenue for Chandler and local school district.  Proposition 123 may have squeaked by Tuesday night but public schools still need lots of help.  These are some of the reasons why the “Park Place” expansion is one of the most anticipated commercial developments in Arizona. 

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The Arizona Republic recently featured an impressive “land bridge” near Oro Valley, Arizona to facilitate highway crossings for wildlife and reduce car accidents with them.  Here is a link.

It prompted an idea.  Why not pursue something similar in Scottsdale for the McDowell Sonoran Preserve which is bisected by Dynamite Boulevard?

It would be far less costly than the proposed Desert Discovery Center (DDC), and enrich the refuge.

The DDC is a specious proposal that seems more supported by inertia than merit.  The burden is on proponents to generate the necessary public support for the project, as preserve advocates once did in early 1990s.  Currently, that doesn’t exist.  Nor does a compelling policy rationale for magnifying the development footprint at the proposed Gateway location.

The city’s construction of trailheads and exhibits at hiking points in the McDowells was so superbly done with so few footprints in God’s desert sands that they have effectively become a desert discovery center unto themselves.

Precious tax dollars should be used for completing the preserve and enhancing that which is already within via things like a land bridge.

Put another way, does anyone go to the Grand Canyon because of the visitor center?  No, they do so because of the majesty.  And so it will always be, and should be, with the McDowell Sonoran Preserve where tourism officials should understand that better marketing of God’s great gift will be far more impactful than marketing towards a redundant facility that seeks to interpret that which people can see for themselves, unadulterated.

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After losing the Republican nomination for the Arizona House of Representatives in 2014 Bob Littlefield found himself without a political title for the first time since 2002.

He couldn’t stand it.  So he’s running for Scottsdale Mayor against a former friend and ally. He’s running despite his wife also serving on the Scottsdale City Council at the same time. And he’s running despite being on every side of every issue from density and heights to the Desert Discovery Center to taking money from special interests and lobbyists.  littlefield at desk

So complete is Littlefield’s hypocrisy on just about every issue in Scottsdale that his acolytes appear to be resulting to rumor mongering in their quixotic quest to displace the popular and reform-oriented Mayor Lane.

The latest is suggesting that Lane would only serve two years if voters elected him for his final term as Mayor later this year because he wants to run for Treasurer?  Nice try.

That scenario is no more plausible than Littlefield being elected and then running anew for the Arizona House of Representatives.  But don’t take our word for it.  Lane’s commitment to his final term is easily confirmed.  Just call his office.  See what he says. 

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Scottsdale Mayor Jim Lane will be seeking a third and final term this August.  The finality has to do with the city’s term limits restriction. Three terms is all one gets to serve consecutively on the City Council or as Mayor.

Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton will not be seeking a third term, even though he would win easily.  That’s because Phoenix restricts the Mayor to serving but two terms.

Which is better policy?  2 or 3?  Or maybe a single six year term like Mexico’s President has?  Or no term limits at all.

It doesn’t matter who you are being an effective Mayor of a large city like Phoenix or a multi-faceted one like Scottsdale takes time.  Stanton has hit his stride.  Downtown Phoenix is one of the most talked about places in the Southwest.  He’s collaborating with Republicans on key education measures.  In short, Phoenix is a city on the move, like Scottsdale. 

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The proposed Desert Discovery Center is one of those ideas that’s been around a long time.  Like wine, some think this is cause to savor the idea further.  Once envisioned as something like an environmental Disneyland it has morphed into something more akin to a duplicative Desert Botanical Garden.

Some on the Scottsdale City Council like Linda Milhaven, Virginia Korte and Suzanne Klapp join many in the local tourism industry and strongly support the project. IMG_7265

Mayor Jim Lane has supported studying the matter further with no commitment to the final project, a position similar to Councilmembers David Smith and Guy Phillips.

Councilwoman Kathy Littlefield opposes the project even though her husband Bob, a failed state legislative candidate last cycle now running for Mayor, supported the project in 2008.

There’s support, opposition and caution but few would disagree the plan is controversial. 

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What a week for Scottsdale Mayor Jim Lane.  If there was ever a time he proved his mettle and wisdom on key issues, and why voters should keep him at the helm of Arizona’s best city, this was it.

*He voted for new, for-sale housing on McDowell Road, continuing the momentum for the corridor and next “it” area in the Valley;

*He’s leading Scottsdale’s effort to lend a boost to the Southwest Wildlife Conservation Center in far north Scottsdale as a neighbor’s effort try to shut down the refuge for mountain lions, bears, jaguars and the creatures and critters of Arizona.  Maricopa County will vote on the matter in early June. Lane has crafted a resolution for the City Council to vote on May 17th lending the city’s full weight to the county’s consideration. Scottsdale-Sign-547x198

*He said no to a renewed effort to get light rail into Scottsdale’s transportation plans.

*Top Valley business leader and Arizona Cardinals owner Michael Bidwill along with former NFL defensive end and current Scottsdale pastor Andre Wadsworth are hosting a fundraiser for Lane tonight.

*He joined with Litchfield Park’s Mayor to warn on today’s Arizona Republic editorial page about the dangers of allowing more casinos into Valley neighborhoods, like the loophole that was used to put one in Glendale. 

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FROM: J.P. Twist, Campaign Manager
TO: Interested Parties
SUBJECT: How We Won

It was January, and I had just watched a discussion on Channel 8’s Journalists Roundtable, where the panel predicted as high as a 70-some percent victory for Prop 123 on May 17. I almost fell out of my chair. If only they were seeing what I was seeing.

Our first poll around the same time told a totally different story. Just 50 percent ‘yes.’ This would be close to the very end, I remember thinking. The electorate was divided – not just on Prop 123, but on the broader discussion about education funding. Voters of both parties – especially in a low turnout special election and in a toxic political climate – were skeptical of pouring more money into anything to do with the government.

Getting voters the facts and explaining the details of a complicated and important policy proposal would be tough, but as we saw this week, not impossible. From our first poll all the way to Election Day, we knew this was going to have to be an aggressive, expensive campaign. A lot was on the line -- $3.5 billion in education funding over the next decade, the settlement of a years-long lawsuit, and immediate pay raises for teachers all over the state.

Through an intense campaign strategy that relied on constant data crunching, targeted voter turnout investments, an unconventional political coalition and messaging tailored to key constituencies that followed polling trends, Prop 123 has achieved victory.

Here’s how we did it.

WHERE WE STARTED

Despite conventional wisdom, Prop 123 was never a slam dunk. In fact, it never hit higher than in the low 50s in our tracking. It peaked at 53 percent in our April poll. But generally, it always hovered right around 50 percent.

January 7-10
YES: 50%
NO: 41%

April 14-17
YES: 53%
NO: 36%

April 25-26
YES: 49%
NO: 40%

May 2-3
YES: 47%
NO: 42%

May 11-12
YES: 49%
NO: 40%

The bottom line is that the race was always close. We knew we wouldn’t just win by chance. And we knew the dynamics of an initiative campaign: It’s a lot harder to get people to ‘yes’ than ‘no.’ If voters are confused, they just say ‘no.’  We always operated under the assumption that the ‘yes’ numbers in our surveys would be what we got, and the “no’s” and “undeciceds” would all ultimately all be ‘no.’

LOW TURNOUT

Polling research and focus groups told us a lot. Some said the proposal was too good to be true. “I want to know more,” one female Independent voter said in a March focus group, when the proposition had yet to garner much media attention. “It seems too good to be true.” Our opening ad addressed that – explaining the proposal in a way that was digestible and understandable.

But there were other dynamics at play that stared us in the face and we knew we needed to address.

“Likely voters” in this race differ dramatically from the larger electorate. More than half were over the age of 65. They are more Republican, with an 11-point advantage over Democrats. And they are more Anglo – 82 percent white.

Our universe were hyper partisan, primary-going voters – the very voters animating the unpredictability we are seeing in the presidential campaign. These voters, including Democrats, are extremely skeptical of government, politicians, traditional institutions and whether schools will use these dollars appropriately.  The Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders factors were very much on our mind as this campaign unfolded.

For many, it was a tough sell to spend this amount of money without strings attached. Counter-intuitively, among both Democratic and Republican voters, the idea that the proposal was “bipartisan” and backed by leaders in both parties was reason enough to say “no.”

“It makes me suspicious,” one female Democratic voters said in our March focus group. “If both sides like it, there’s got to be something wrong with it.”  This is the level of distrust that exists right now in the electorate – the negativism is almost unbelievable, and it got worse every month during the campaign

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by Team O'Halleran

According to the National Park Service, the Grand Canyon National Park supports 7,400 jobs and creates more than $467 million for the local economy.

Protecting the Grand Canyon National Park is not only critical to preserving its majestic landscape, but to securing the economic benefits it provides for our community.

Click here to advocate

The Grand Canyon National Park provides visitors from across the globe an opportunity to enjoy beautiful scenery and fun recreational activities.

But let us not forget the financial stability the park generates for so many in our community.

Join us to advocate for the protection of the Grand Canyon National Park:

Team O’Halleran

 

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by Friends of John McCain

Phoenix, AZ— Today, National Right to Life endorsed John McCain for the United States Senate. John McCain has fought for policies to protect the unborn and has a 100% voting record on pro-life issues:

“I am honored to receive the endorsement of National Right to Life, an organization that promotes respect and dignity of every individual human being, born or unborn," said John McCain. "As a lifetime pro-life supporter, I have fought to defend the rights of all human life and I will continue this fight in the U.S. Senate."

"All voters who are concerned with the right to life and with the protection of the most vulnerable members of the human family should vote to return John McCain to the U.S. Senate, so that he can continue to work to advance vital pro-life public policies," said Carol Tobias, President of National Right to Life.

Other national pro-life advocates praised the endorsement of John McCain:
“Senator McCain is steady and unwavering friend to unborn children and their mothers and we are proud to have him on the side of life. He is a good listener, strategic thinker, and helpful ally in our fight to advance the right to life and protect the conscience rights of pro-life Americans.” – Marjorie Dannenfelser, President of Susan B. Anthony List

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by Bill Gates for Arizona

Phoenix, AZ – Today the Bill Gates for County Supervisor campaign announced the endorsements of Senator Adam Driggs (R-28), Representative Kate Brophy McGee (R-28), Representative Phil Lovas (R-22), Representative Paul Boyer (R-20), Representative Anthony Kern (R-20), and Representative Heather Carter (R-15).

"I have known Bill Gates for years. He is a hard worker, a man of integrity and someone I call a friend," said State Representative Kate Brophy McGee. "I am proud to endorse Bill for Maricopa County Board of Supervisor. He has proven to be a steward of the taxpayers’ money at the City and I know he will do the same at the County."

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SAYS BLACK VOTERS BEING WOOED, BLACK VOTES IN PLAY FOR NOVEMBER

Rev. Maupin's Statement Below:

"As an advocate for Civil Rights, I have an obligation to endorse a candidate for the U.S. Senate that will bring much needed jobs, affordable housing, and infrastructure dollars to Phoenix and other urban areas in Arizona. In this year's November election, that candidate will be John McCain,

"I am endorsing John now, before the general election, because there is urgent work to be done, in the now, to reach out and secure the votes of Black Arizonans and others before November's contest,

"This endorsement is not about Republican vs Democrat, Right vs Left, or Old vs New. This endorsement is about Right vs Wrong. McCain is right for Arizona and his opponents - in his party primary and in the general election - have proven that. How? By taking Black voters for granted and refusing to articulate in a meaningful way how they intend to address poverty, housing, education, employment, and criminal justice issues that disproportionately impact Black Americans. McCain, on the other hand, is actively engaging Black leaders to find policy solutions and creative ways to bridge the racial divide and level America's uneven economic and social playing fields, 

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By Yes on Prop 123

PHOENIX — Former U.S. Senator Jon Kyl today announced his endorsement of Proposition 123, citing the need for a fiscally responsible plan to help fund Arizona’s public schools.

“Proposition 123 is a common-sense solution that would inject $3.5 billion into Arizona’s K-12 public schools without raising taxes,” former U.S. Senator Jon Kyl said. “It’s a fiscally sound, responsible plan that is badly needed to help students and teachers achieve in the classroom. I strongly encourage you to join me, and many other conservatives in voting YES on Prop 123.”

“Our teachers and students need resources in the classroom,” Sharon Harper, chairwoman of the YES on Prop 123 campaign said. “This is a fiscally responsible plan that puts money in the classroom now. It’s a conservative solution, it’s an innovative solution and it doesn’t put Arizona’s fiscal future in jeopardy. Let’s do what’s right for Arizona — vote YES on Prop 123.”

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Prop 123 is a ballot measure that settles a years-long lawsuit and puts $3.5 billion into Arizona’s K-12 public schools over the next 10 years without raising taxes. The proposition goes to the ballot on May 17.

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Arizona Progress & Gazette: Arizona News, Editorials & Debate