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Forbes is now highlighting Governor Ducey’s forward-thinking plan to fund K-12 education without raising taxes. Read and share this column on how Arizona is leading the way with smart policy:

Back To School: Arizona Gov. Ducey's Smart Education Plan
Travis H. Brown
Forbes
9/14/2015

With a promising business environment and a governor who understands smart fiscal policy, Arizona is in a position to win big. This growth opportunity comes out of sound economic footing, thanks to Arizona’s decades-long knack for drawing overtaxed Americans to its friendlier climate. What matters most is that Arizona not grow complacent with its successes; the Grand Canyon State needs to capitalize on past wins as well as initiate new, pro-growth strategies. That’s why Governor Doug Ducey’s ideas for investing more in education are so encouraging – and why he should take this opportunity to do even more.

Let’s start with the recent past. Individual taxpayer filings with the Internal Revenue Service tell the story: between 1992 and 2013, Arizona gained $31.4 billion in net adjusted gross income (AGI) from other states. The three states that have lost the most net AGI to Arizona are three of the nation’s most oppressively taxing: California, Illinois, and New York. (Those three states gifted Arizona with the largest number of new residents, as well.)

Using data modeling to create taxpayer count projections for 2013 to 2016, we find Arizona in the winner’s circle. It’s in the top-five projected gainers, lagging only behind Florida, Texas, and North Carolina. Arizona’s projected gain in that period is $3.96 billion. For that same time period, the losses of the top-five projected losers are staggering – New York is on track to see about $12 billion in net AGI leave the state, while Illinois will lose about $6.28 billion (knocking out California for the inauspicious “honor” of being the second-biggest AGI loser in the nation). 

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by Jeff DeWitt

It has been an honor to serve Arizona as State Treasurer. I wanted to take a few minutes and thank everyone for their continued support. It is unbelievable how much my life has changed as I went from an everyday father working in the financial world to being elected as Arizona State Treasurer. The road here was not easy, but very worth it as I have been able to put my 23 years of financial experience to use in serving our community. I wanted to make sure you all know how grateful I am for your votes and support.

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By Dr. Kelli Ward

It’s official. As you read this, I am in Lake Havasu announcing my campaign for the U.S. Senate!

I’m ready to retire John McCain and give voters a fresh, courageous choice for new conservative leadership, and I hope you’ll join my effort. Together, we can disrupt the status quo and begin a new era of lower taxes, less spending, secure borders, and respect for the Constitution.

I made this video for those of you who couldn’t be here tonight. Please take a minute to watch it. Tomorrow, we begin the fight to shake up Washington!

This campaign is just beginning, but it’s the support and encouragement of tens of thousands of Arizonans like you over the last few months that have made it possible.

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Standard and Poor's recently assigned Arizona the strongest rating the state has had since 2008.

Commentary by Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey
June 22, 2015

When I was sworn in as Arizona's governor on January 5, the Super Bowl was set to kick off in our state just four weeks later.

Amid all the planning and upcoming festivities, there was a wrinkle: One of the state's regulatory agencies I inherited had been running sting operations against Uber and Lyft drivers, aggressively trying to shut them down. State regulators were out of control and using taxpayer resources to try to put the brakes on a wildly popular service.

We worried about what this might mean during a major event like the Super Bowl, when 100,000 visitors were on their way to Arizona.

So I took action, replacing the agency's leadership and immediately ending all pending regulatory actions against ride-share operators.

Next, we passed statutory language, making it clear these ride-share operators can do business in Arizona. And for good measure, we are in the process of abolishing the very department where all the regulatory mischief originated.

Breaking down these antiquated regulations made a lot of heads spin among entrenched interests. But the reality is that Uber and Lyft drivers are small-business owners—regular people who are just trying to make an honest living and, in the process, are changing the way we get around.

Our pro-business mind-set is paying off. Recently, Uber announced the opening of its first-ever Center of Excellence in downtown Phoenix. By the end of the year, the center will employ 300 people who will provide support to drivers and passengers.

This is just the latest in a string of good news for our state and a loud message that Arizona is open for business.

See, while everyone was watching the Super Bowl, our office was working. The day after the big game, we announced that the most successful company in history—Apple—was making one of its largest investments ever right here in our state: a $2 billion data center to serve as a command center for the company's global networks.

A lot of what we're doing in Arizona is forcing our government to enter the 21st century so that 21st-century companies can operate here.

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by Rick Santorum

Fellow Conservative,

Yesterday, I officially announced my candidacy for President of the United States.

And now, I need YOUR help to take back America!

If you're ready to join me, will you please pitch in a generous financial gift right now to help me kickstart my campaign?

I believe that it's going to take a fearless, unapologetic, conservative leader to stand up to Hillary Clinton and win back the White House in 2016.

And I believe I am that leader.

As a United States Senator, I spent many years fighting passionately for conservative solutions to our nation's problems and policies that foster and strengthen working families.

And as the leader of one of the nation's largest grassroots organizations, Patriot Voices, my passion has only grown.

Unfortunately, the Obama-Clinton agenda has undone much of what we've fought for, and hard working Americans are paying the price.

But this doesn't have to be the end of the story. Together, we can take back America and build a brighter future!

Please pitch in whatever you can right now.
Our nation is hurting right now.

Working families are more heavily burdened than ever by excessive government intrusion, regulation, and bureaucracy.

Our national debt has skyrocketed at an unprecedented and dangerous rate as a result of Barack Obama's left-wing policies.

Our stature on the world's stage is embarrassingly weak. Our allies - and our homeland - are in grave danger from ISIS and other radical Islamic terrorist organizations.

And our freedom to practice our faith is under vicious attack in our communities, in our states, and even nationwide.

I'm prepared to answer the call and tackle every one of these challenges. I am determined to bring this nation back from the brink.

But I'm going to need your help to do it. Will you please pitch in a generous gift to help me launch this campaign right now?

This is going to be a long and grueling campaign.

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Improvements to Ariz. Tuition Tax Credit Scholarships await Governor’s signature

HB2483 and HB2153 offer accountability measures and expand the Corporate Tuition Tax Credit programs

PHOENIX (March 31, 2015) — The American Federation for Children, the nation’s voice for educational choice, applauds the Arizona Legislature for passing educational choice bills which increase transparency among School Tuition Organizations (STOs) and expand the Corporate Tuition Tax Credit program to include donations from small corporations. HB2483, sponsored by Rep. David Livingston, passed the House this afternoon with a 41 to 19 bipartisan vote. The legislation requires STOs to report on their websites the amount of money awarded to low-income families through private school scholarships. HB2153, sponsored by Rep. Justin Olson, passed the Senate with a vote of 16 to 13. This bill brings parity for small businesses (S-Corps) to have the ability to donate to the state’s Corporate Tuition Tax Credit program which funds STOs.

“We applaud Reps. Livingston and Olson, as well as all of the legislators who voted in favor of improving this crucial scholarship program, which helps Arizona’s high-risk and low-income students,” said Kim Martinez, American Federation for Children communications associate. “The Corporate Tuition Tax Credit program brings opportunity to children who could never afford to attend private school otherwise. Adding more accountability and expanding the funding pool helps secure the program for current and future recipients.”

HB2483 requires School Tuition Organizations to disclose on their website and through Department of Revenue reports, how much money they are in fact using to scholarship low-income children. This transparency allows corporate donors to see which STOs are helping disadvantaged children the most and how much money they are actually giving in low-income based scholarships.

HB2153 allows S-Corps to receive a dollar-for-dollar tax credit for contributions to school tuition organizations. This provides many Arizona small businesses with the opportunity to donate to STOs if they so choose and receive the same tax benefit as large corporations.

School Tuition Organizations are required by law to distribute 90 percent of the corporate tax credit donations they receive in the form of scholarships to low-income children.

HB2483 and HB2153 now go to Gov. Ducey for consideration.

The Arizona Federation for Children is a state affiliate of the American Federation for Children.

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Over the weekend Arizona Republic readers might have noticed a letter to the editor from David Ortega.  He waxed ineloquent, as history most often records his commentaries, about the inadequacies of Proposition 123.  There are good arguments on both sides of that issue, though many more in support.  This is not meant to be judgment on them.   Only on Ortega.

For he noticeably signed his letter “former Scottsdale City Councilman.” Dude, that was over a decade ago and we’re really not sure why such a title would qualify him any more than anyone else to opine about contemporary education policy.

What is it with people who can’t let go of such identity? It’s like the Grandpa who threw a no-hitter in high school and can’t stop telling the family about it every holiday dinner. 

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Just a couple of months back Scottsdale almost had a lot more than proverbial egg on its face.  It almost had a whole carton making its mug unrecognizable.

That’s when some on the Scottsdale City Council were actually considering not allowing the BASIS charter school to relocate and expand its presence on Shea Boulevard.  Fortunately, Mayor Lane, Suzanne Klapp and Linda Milhaven led the charge, and with assists from Governor Ducey and Attorney General Brnovich everyone else but Councilman Guy Phillips came along for the ride.

Imagine if the right decision wouldn’t have been made by Scottsdale and then these national school rankings by U.S. News & World Report came out? http://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/blog/business/2016/04/basis-charter-schools-take-top-spots-on-us-news.html 

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It’s always good to invoke Star Trek, especially when it comes to Bob Littlefield.  Because his campaign for Scottsdale Mayor seems to be from outer space.  And his campaign, in the unlikely event it is successful, would boldly take he and wife where no man has gone before:  a husband and wife team on the Scottsdale City Council.

We’re sure, no positive, absolutely certain that the Arizona Attorney General would NEVER, ever, never ever, come knocking at Scottsdale’s door because of open meeting laws violations.
littlefield at desk

But that’s not why we opine now.  It’s to reveal the game Bob Littlefield plays with south Scottsdale, and how he preys on their disenfranchisement only to stab them in the back to serve himself.

Take for example his ambulance chasing opposition to Entrada, the most important project proposed in south Scottsdale in years.  It would transform the ghost town of car dealerships on the northeast corner of 64th Street and McDowell into a terrific new gateway for the area with mixed-use development.  It’s the private sector finally responding, without government subsidy, to what many of us have been saying all along. South Scottsdale is a hidden jewel and the next neighborhoods in the Valley to go through a revitalizing “it” moment.  But that doesn’t serve Bob’s purpose.  He wants people to stay angry at the city because  it’s the only way he gains votes.  He certainly can’t win a contest of ideas or congeniality.  Indeed, he was the city councilperson when serving to refuse to sign a civility pledge. 

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Transforming the 32-acre Margaret Hance Park in central Phoenix to something more akin to Central Park is the best planning idea in the Valley today.  Read about it here. 

We hope the “Hance Park Conservancy” is one day regarded like the McDowell Sonoran Conservancy in Scottsdale.  There, volunteers and fundraisers alike act as stewards for one of the great preserves any city in America has created.

Both are in the spirit of the great Robert Moses who over decades let New York breathe a little easier with his expanse of recreational amenities and planning imagination.

We hope someone like him will emerge in Phoenix now to see that a great idea doesn’t sit on a drawing table.  It has happened before.  Not too long ago it was believed Indian School Park would emerge as that great, good Phoenix place.  But it certainly hasn’t evolved so. 

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There used to be a popular soap opera called As The World Turns.  The same title could apply to the prologue unfolding for the 2019 Mayor’s race in the City of Phoenix.

Due to term limits popular incumbent Greg Stanton will not be able to seek re-election.  But former City Councilman Tom Simplot has made it known he wants the job, as does embattled current Councilman Michael Nowakowski.

Last year Simplot sympathizers sought to damage Nowakowski over questions involving a downtown Phoenix land deal.  They viewed him as their greatest threat.  And while Nowakowski has recovered somewhat with news of downtown Phoenix’s grocery store unicorn finally landing, there’s no doubt his future prospects have been wounded.  But Simplot’s camp may regret his struggles. 

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Former Scottsdale City Councilman Bob Littlefield and failed Republican candidate for the Arizona House of Representatives thinks Scottsdale is a terrible place to live and be.  Just listen to him.  When he’s not sounding Area 51 he makes Scottsdale sound like Blythe.  If you think our community Hades Bob is your guy.

Now he’s running for Mayor.  We’re sorry to spend so much time of late on Littlefield but we’re a little like comedians blessed by Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton. The content is just so rich, so long, so hypocritical.

Take for example Littlefield’s raison d’etre.  It’s that the little guy can’t get a break in Scottsdale, notwithstanding that the city was just recognized as a great place to start a business. But for Bob’s magnificence the struggling would never have a voice.  You’d think he had even started Vista del Camino, although like many things that run contrary to his narrative he had nothing to do with it.  You’d think he’d be embarrassed carrying on his message after having participated in the most outrageous evisceration of Scottsdale citizen rights in the past two decades; that being when he enacted an “emergency clause” to stop a public vote on the densest project in city history at the Scottsdale Waterfront.

Scottsdale has some great historians within its midst that often take the time to write about our history, and its application to our future.

But it doesn’t take a historian to remember when Littlefield’s hypocrisy was on full display yet again.

Let us take you back to late 2005 and early 2006.  Facing his first re-election test Littlefield engaged in political skullduggery to deep six a citizen activist from challenging him.  His deceit (and that of others) became the topic of a stinging Scottsdale Republic editorial critique that can be reviewed HERE.

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*Pinal County Sheriff Paul Babeu is showing a lot of resilience as he tries to become the Republican nominee in Arizona’s First Congressional District.  That’s according to a new poll out this week albeit by his own pollster.  In boxing terms we’re going to find out what kind of chin Babeu has when the pointed attacks about his private life get leveled this year.  But what’s underappreciated is what kind of outside help Babeu may get in return from socially liberal Republicans looking to install the first openly gay Republican in Congress.

*Speaking of Congress, former Maricopa County Supervisor Don Stapley announced a run for seat of retiring Congressman Matt Salmon.  If Stapley won he might have the distinction of having the best (or worst) toupee in DC.

*Bob Littlefield is a bad bet for Mayor of Scottsdale.  Guy Phillips is a better bet for City Council.  Guy would be wise to be his own guy and not side-saddle with Littlefield whose collapse during his 2014 race for the Arizona House of Representatives is now part of local legend.

*Tom Simplot is amassing a formidable armada for his expected run for Phoenix Mayor in 2019.

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Through three terms and twelve years on the Scottsdale City Council there stood Kathy Littlefield, next to her office holding husband Bob.  Never one to interrupt, never one to take the limelight from him.

But as Bob realized term limits were approaching in 2014 he decided he couldn’t live without a political title.  He ran for the Arizona House of Representatives.  At the same time Kathy decided to enter the Scottsdale City Council race.  The thinking went she would replace him and he would gain import anew at the State Capitol.  Power couple!

But something strange happened along the way.  Bob got trounced in the Republican primary because he’s not much of a Republican.  And Kathy won a council seat by just dozens of votes. 

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In making our point here we certainly don’t mean to imply the Scottsdale City Council to be the Seven Dwarfs.  Indeed, many of them stand tall to make the city the envy of the country.  Many of them would be standouts on any city council.

But when Bob Littlefield served on the same City Council until being defeated several years ago as a Republican candidate for the State House of Representatives there’s no doubt he was Grumpy.    And that was OK.  Scottsdale is best served when there is a variety of opinion on the dais.

Now he wants to be Mayor.  But when it comes to being such can anyone really picture Bob Littlefield espousing at a State of the City?  Negotiating with a new company to land within our midst?  Watching Milli Vanilli at the Milan Opera House might be more likely. lg

Bob’s not just Grumpy.  He can be downright mean.  Like the time he bludgeoned local pastor Andre Wadsworth during council remarks.

It’s not that a Scottsdale Mayor shouldn’t have a temper.  Sometime one is needed to light a fire under bureaucrats or play hardball in negotiations.  But Littlefield is just so foreign to the happy warriors that have occupied the office.

Whether one agreed or disagreed with Herb Drinkwater, Mary Manross, Sam Campana or Jim Lane just to name the more recent ones they served with a smile and a sobriety, unlike Littlefield who would do so with scorn and more lubriciousness. 

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Over two decades ago you couldn’t escape local news about Maricopa County government. When it wasn’t teetering on the edge of bankruptcy it was in the crosshairs of a fierce debate over a proposed sales tax to fund a new baseball stadium for Jerry Colangelo.  Bob Mohan was making a big name for himself skewering pro-stadium politicos on KFYI and Supervisor Wilcox even got shot in the butt by a troubled taxpayer.

Is history repeating itself?  The county is certainly back in the news in a big way.

First, was the Presidential Primary Election voting fiasco.   Then there was the brush back pitch from the Diamondbacks about funding a new stadium, or paying sufficiently to refurbish this one.

Tomorrow however they get an easier one.  As outlined today on the editorial pages of the Arizona Republic (here is a link) one of the more benevolent uses within its jurisdiction is the Southwest Wildlife Rehabilitation Center just east of Scottsdale.  There a wonderful woman has cared for animals that can’t care for themselves, just as she has for 22 years.  And there a neighbor who moved in just several years ago is trying to shut them down.  His name is David Seth Gortler and he’s proving himself to be the clown prince of NIMBYs.

Fortunately, Gortler is a party of one.  A worldwide petition will be presented to the Maricopa County Board of Supervisors Wednesday with over 185,000 signatures, and climbing.  The petition encourages its 5 members to grant the approvals that will remove the hardships and uncertainty caused by Gortler’s litigation and hypocrisy.

At a time when Maricopa County is facing fierce criticism there is no better opportunity to earn back some kudos, and justifiably so, than standing up for one of the finest causes in the Valley today.

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We don’t bemoan any working boy in the public affairs world.  But when an outlet proves to be as open to conversion as the Sonoran Alliance has of late on energy policy it is a bit conspicuous, if not obviously a case of promiscuous politics.

You see, it was once upon a time that Sonoran Alliance talked of “crony capitalism” not as a critique of solar companies but that Arizona utilities were abusing their monopoly status to squelch competition from these emerging tech companies.  The blog wrote about utilities then, much as its contributors do about Uber, or as Ted Cruz might describe the nation’s capital:  a cartel in need of some challenge.  After all, solar companies don’t enjoy nearly the subsidies utilities do, most especially the biggest subsidy of all: monopoly status.  We could opine further but there’s really no need as there is really only one dynamic in this debate to highlight the blog’s hypocrisy:  money. Taxi drivers and utilities occupy the same intellectual property yet one has sufficient money to interrupt traditional behavior, and one does not. PrettyWoman_293Pyxurz

So when the Sonoran Alliance starts paying attention to Arizona Corporation Commission hearings in Lake Havasu City and criticizing ratepayers there revolting against the Canadian utility monopoly’s plans to lighten everyone’s wallets (Here is a link) we thinks it’s not too hard to imagine what’s going on.

To further enforce our point it would be easy to make reference to a movie, say something like Pretty Woman.  But that would be too easy, like Julia Roberts’ character was. After all, she ended up being likable and informative, like Sonoran Alliance has been until late.  In fact, Vivian Ward was particularly insightful about Philip Stuckey. Readers will recall him as Richard Gere’s sidekick who was overbearing, ruthless and obnoxious.  Come to think of it that sounds a lot like Arizona’s utilities today.  Just as they found a way to fend off Arizona Republicans once upon a time like Brenda Burns, Bob Burns and even Gary Pierce who wanted to introduce more choice into Arizona electricity markets, they are now attempting a 1-2 punch with “demand charges” and solar tariffs to again knock out any semblance of competition. 

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There are few nicer people in Scottsdale than Kathy Littlefield.  Or as irascible as Bob Littlefield.  Scottsdale should not be their guinea pig and allow Bob to serve as Mayor (he’s a longshot candidate) while Kathy serves as a Councilwoman.  The plethora of open meeting law violation possibilities and other legal problems would likely be long while civic tempers grow short at the weirdness their ways would mean for the city.   But that doesn’t mean their collective efforts in other areas can’t be applauded.

Take what they did for the struggling residents of the Wheel Inn Ranch Trailer park.  As reported by the Scottsdale Independent the couple along with Councilman Guy Phillips and others stepped up for some people who needed it most. 

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By Let's Vote Yes for Arizona Schools

More than 20 school districts are waiting on approval of Prop 123

PHOENIX – For Arizona teachers, many of whom have not received a pay raise since before the Great Recession, passage of Proposition 123 means a needed and necessary pay raise this year.

So far, more than 20 Arizona school districts have released or passed provisional budgets that include pay raises for teachers. But those raises will evaporate in most communities without the guaranteed dollars that Proposition 123 provides.

“School boards across the state are struggling to attract and retain good, quality teachers,” said Tim Ogle, executive director of the Arizona School Boards Association. “School board members around Arizona have indicated that if Proposition 123 passes, teacher raises will be the first line item in their budgets and the first item on their agendas to pass. But, without the dollars that Proposition 123 brings, teachers will continue to receive unacceptably low pay for the work they’re doing to educate our kids and we will continue to see teachers flee Arizona for other states. At the end of the day, the only way to improve education in Arizona is with a high-quality teacher in the classroom.”

“Teacher pay in Arizona is embarrassingly low,” said Andrew Morrill, president of the Arizona Education Association. “Many, if not most, teachers in Arizona have gone six or seven years without even a nominal increase in their pay, hence our teacher shortage crisis. If Proposition 123 doesn’t pass, it’ll send a message to our teachers that we don’t appreciate or respect the work they’re doing to educate our kids, and they’ll continue leaving Arizona for higher paying teaching positions in other states or leaving the profession altogether. Prop 123 is the first step to get teachers in nearly all districts a raise this year, and keeping them in Arizona.”

“Arizona teachers have gone too long without getting the compensation they deserve,” said Sharon Harper, chairwoman of the Let’s Vote Yes for Arizona Schools, in support of Prop 123 campaign. “Let’s pass Proposition 123 so we can stem the tide of teachers leaving our schools and our state. The infusion of these dollars will get money in the classroom this year. If we do nothing, this will be the equivalent of a pay cut to teachers in Arizona.”

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By State Treasurer of Arizona Jeff DeWit

Proposition 123 is LESS money for schools and RAISES PROPERTY TAXES

I wish I could support Proposition 123.  I wish it was in the best interest of our schools, teachers, and taxpayers.  I wish it lived up to the claim of being “more money for schools without raising taxes.”  Unfortunately it is none of these things.

Anytime politicians tell you they have found a way to spend money without raising taxes, they are either raising debt or raiding a trust fund.  It is why our federal government owes $19 Trillion and our Social Security Trust Fund is depleted.  Our federal government has made false promises, and Arizona is now following suit.

Proposition 123 is a raid on the Schools’ Permanent Endowment Trust Fund which was established by Congress at Arizona’s statehood.  It is a pool of money intended to grow for the benefit of educating Arizona schoolchildren forever.  We can spend interest, but we are never to spend principle, as this plan does in a BIG way.  Proposition 123 violates this Congressional requirement, and if passed, a new multi-year lawsuit will likely begin, further delaying funding for our schools.

The politicians are saying that this Trust is “underperforming our schools.”  This is incorrect.  The amount we spend on schools from the Trust is now the highest in Arizona history, roughly $100 million a year, and should double about every seven years.  Voting NO on Proposition 123 keeps this money for its intended purpose, benefiting our schools forever.  Saying yes cuts the trust fund by over a third, costs our schools (and ultimately our taxpayers) Billions of dollars, keeps teacher pay at 50th in the country, raises property taxes, and creates a huge fiscal cliff in ten years that will hit hardworking taxpayers.

Let me say part of that again.  Right now Arizona is 50th in the country in teacher pay.  If Prop 123 passes, and the trust fund is raided, and when property taxes increase, we will still be 50th in the country in teacher pay!  As the Arizona Republic has pointed out, this is merely a "scam" on the voters to make them think that this is free money, when in reality it comes at a very high price to our children, teachers, and taxpayers.  Read here: http://www.azcentral.com/story/opinion/op-ed/ej-montini/2016/04/18/montini-gov-doug-ducey-league-of-women-voters-proposition-123-arizona-legislature-state-land-trust/83157214/ 

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Fred DuVal, the 2014 Democratic nominee for Governor, just endorsed Proposition 123.

Read his statement, here.

He is standing shoulder to shoulder with Governor Ducey and thousands of parents and educators to put our kids and teachers first. And we've got an new TV ad to prove it. Watch the video here.

Mr. DuVal and Governor Ducey don't always agree but they agree Prop 123 is a necessary first step towards improving Arizona's public schools.

Prop 123 is a perfect example of what Arizonans can accomplish when we work together.

They recognize just how important it is for us to inject $3.5 billion into public K-12 schools over the next 10 years without raising taxes.

We are proud that Democrats and Republicans are putting partisan politics aside and working together to get our schools the resources they need.

Join us, Fred DuVal, Governor Doug Ducey and countless others in supporting Proposition 123, and lend a hand to ensure this passes on May 17.

Thanks,

Team Prop 123

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By Dan Schweiker

Transportation has always been near and dear to my heart. I first experienced the valley's roads in 1978 when I arrived in Arizona in my un-air conditioned 1976 Honda Civic. A lot has changed since then, but one thing remains the same – we need an interconnected transportation system that moves people, goods, and services.

There is no doubt that our valley has grown. The number of freeways, streets, and transit options have increased and improved over time as well. I remember when the I-10 tunnel was completed with much fanfare and when the Loop 101 finally came to Scottsdale.

It was my honor to serve on the Maricopa Association of Governments Regional Transportation Committee in 2003 and 2004 as we worked on the Regional Transportation Plan and the extension of the 1985 half cent sales tax that built our transportation system. One of the things we realized early on is that we must take a multi-modal approach to transportation planning.

We realized that we must take into account the cost, available land, traffic patterns, growth, and interconnectivity into our planning. We learned that different areas had different needs and an interconnected plan could not be a "one size fits all" approach. We also adopted fundraising firewalls and audit measures to ensure fiscal responsibility. The result was the passage of Proposition 400 in 2004 which is still improving transportation across the region.

In Scottsdale, the Transportation Commission has released a draft of their Transportation Master Plan. It is a comprehensive proposal that will help strengthen our city's transportation policies and improve connectivity for our future. The Scottsdale City Council is meeting on April 12 in a study session to review the plan. 

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PHOENIX — Chandler Mayor Jay Tibshraeny today endorsed Proposition 123 citing the resources it will provide teachers and students throughout the next 10 years.

The Joint Legislative Budget Committee (JLBC) estimates that Chandler Unified School District will receive more than $9 million this year alone if Prop 123 passes. 

"I'm supporting Prop 123 because it's going to provide our schools, teachers and students with stability and support for the next decade," Mayor Tibshraeny said. "It will put billions of dollars into Arizona’s K-12 public education system over the next decade without raising taxes. It's prudent, fiscally responsible, and will help our teachers and students succeed in the classroom. Join me and vote YES on May 17."

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by Paul Babeu

Have you seen the latest poll?

It has us up big in Arizona's 1st Congressional District.35% of voters have rallied behind me, and our campaign, which has given us a 27-point lead.

This is all great news, and wouldn't be possible without you and all of your help.

The liberals in Arizona want no part of facing me in November, and they'll be throwing money at this race to stop us.

We're not going to let that happen.

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Arizona Progress & Gazette: Arizona News, Editorials & Debate