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2018 Scrum

By Lee Templar
Director of Foundation Relations
The Goldwater Institute

California is poised to become the 25th state that adopts the Right To Try—a law that will help terminally ill patients try promising new medicines pending final approval from the Food and Drug Administration. But Governor Jerry Brown might veto the Right To Try. We need your help to persuade Governor Brown to do what’s best for terminally ill patients who should have the right to fight to save their own lives.

You can call Governor Brown’s office at (916) 445-2841. You can send him an email through this form: https://govnews.ca.gov/gov39mail/mail.php. You can also send him a message on Twitter at @JerryBrownGov and through Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/jerrybrown.

More than 1 million Americans die from diseases each year. They deserve a chance to try the same medicines that a lucky few already are safely using in clinical trials.

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Dear Friend ,

Forbes is now highlighting Governor Ducey’s forward-thinking plan to fund K-12 education without raising taxes. Read and share this column on how Arizona is leading the way with smart policy:

Back To School: Arizona Gov. Ducey's Smart Education Plan
Travis H. Brown
Forbes
9/14/2015

With a promising business environment and a governor who understands smart fiscal policy, Arizona is in a position to win big. This growth opportunity comes out of sound economic footing, thanks to Arizona’s decades-long knack for drawing overtaxed Americans to its friendlier climate. What matters most is that Arizona not grow complacent with its successes; the Grand Canyon State needs to capitalize on past wins as well as initiate new, pro-growth strategies. That’s why Governor Doug Ducey’s ideas for investing more in education are so encouraging – and why he should take this opportunity to do even more.

Let’s start with the recent past. Individual taxpayer filings with the Internal Revenue Service tell the story: between 1992 and 2013, Arizona gained $31.4 billion in net adjusted gross income (AGI) from other states. The three states that have lost the most net AGI to Arizona are three of the nation’s most oppressively taxing: California, Illinois, and New York. (Those three states gifted Arizona with the largest number of new residents, as well.)

Using data modeling to create taxpayer count projections for 2013 to 2016, we find Arizona in the winner’s circle. It’s in the top-five projected gainers, lagging only behind Florida, Texas, and North Carolina. Arizona’s projected gain in that period is $3.96 billion. For that same time period, the losses of the top-five projected losers are staggering – New York is on track to see about $12 billion in net AGI leave the state, while Illinois will lose about $6.28 billion (knocking out California for the inauspicious “honor” of being the second-biggest AGI loser in the nation). 

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by Jeff DeWitt

It has been an honor to serve Arizona as State Treasurer. I wanted to take a few minutes and thank everyone for their continued support. It is unbelievable how much my life has changed as I went from an everyday father working in the financial world to being elected as Arizona State Treasurer. The road here was not easy, but very worth it as I have been able to put my 23 years of financial experience to use in serving our community. I wanted to make sure you all know how grateful I am for your votes and support.

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By Dr. Kelli Ward

It’s official. As you read this, I am in Lake Havasu announcing my campaign for the U.S. Senate!

I’m ready to retire John McCain and give voters a fresh, courageous choice for new conservative leadership, and I hope you’ll join my effort. Together, we can disrupt the status quo and begin a new era of lower taxes, less spending, secure borders, and respect for the Constitution.

I made this video for those of you who couldn’t be here tonight. Please take a minute to watch it. Tomorrow, we begin the fight to shake up Washington!

This campaign is just beginning, but it’s the support and encouragement of tens of thousands of Arizonans like you over the last few months that have made it possible.

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Standard and Poor's recently assigned Arizona the strongest rating the state has had since 2008.

Commentary by Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey
June 22, 2015

When I was sworn in as Arizona's governor on January 5, the Super Bowl was set to kick off in our state just four weeks later.

Amid all the planning and upcoming festivities, there was a wrinkle: One of the state's regulatory agencies I inherited had been running sting operations against Uber and Lyft drivers, aggressively trying to shut them down. State regulators were out of control and using taxpayer resources to try to put the brakes on a wildly popular service.

We worried about what this might mean during a major event like the Super Bowl, when 100,000 visitors were on their way to Arizona.

So I took action, replacing the agency's leadership and immediately ending all pending regulatory actions against ride-share operators.

Next, we passed statutory language, making it clear these ride-share operators can do business in Arizona. And for good measure, we are in the process of abolishing the very department where all the regulatory mischief originated.

Breaking down these antiquated regulations made a lot of heads spin among entrenched interests. But the reality is that Uber and Lyft drivers are small-business owners—regular people who are just trying to make an honest living and, in the process, are changing the way we get around.

Our pro-business mind-set is paying off. Recently, Uber announced the opening of its first-ever Center of Excellence in downtown Phoenix. By the end of the year, the center will employ 300 people who will provide support to drivers and passengers.

This is just the latest in a string of good news for our state and a loud message that Arizona is open for business.

See, while everyone was watching the Super Bowl, our office was working. The day after the big game, we announced that the most successful company in history—Apple—was making one of its largest investments ever right here in our state: a $2 billion data center to serve as a command center for the company's global networks.

A lot of what we're doing in Arizona is forcing our government to enter the 21st century so that 21st-century companies can operate here.

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by Rick Santorum

Fellow Conservative,

Yesterday, I officially announced my candidacy for President of the United States.

And now, I need YOUR help to take back America!

If you're ready to join me, will you please pitch in a generous financial gift right now to help me kickstart my campaign?

I believe that it's going to take a fearless, unapologetic, conservative leader to stand up to Hillary Clinton and win back the White House in 2016.

And I believe I am that leader.

As a United States Senator, I spent many years fighting passionately for conservative solutions to our nation's problems and policies that foster and strengthen working families.

And as the leader of one of the nation's largest grassroots organizations, Patriot Voices, my passion has only grown.

Unfortunately, the Obama-Clinton agenda has undone much of what we've fought for, and hard working Americans are paying the price.

But this doesn't have to be the end of the story. Together, we can take back America and build a brighter future!

Please pitch in whatever you can right now.
Our nation is hurting right now.

Working families are more heavily burdened than ever by excessive government intrusion, regulation, and bureaucracy.

Our national debt has skyrocketed at an unprecedented and dangerous rate as a result of Barack Obama's left-wing policies.

Our stature on the world's stage is embarrassingly weak. Our allies - and our homeland - are in grave danger from ISIS and other radical Islamic terrorist organizations.

And our freedom to practice our faith is under vicious attack in our communities, in our states, and even nationwide.

I'm prepared to answer the call and tackle every one of these challenges. I am determined to bring this nation back from the brink.

But I'm going to need your help to do it. Will you please pitch in a generous gift to help me launch this campaign right now?

This is going to be a long and grueling campaign.

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With State Senator Adam Driggs retiring two seats are up for grabs in the upcoming race for the Arizona House of Representatives in Legislative District 28. That’s because a current holder of one of those seats, Kate Brophy McGee, is running to replace Driggs as is the other State Representative, Eric Meyer, a doctor.

The House calls for their replacements are easy ones to make, both Republicans.

First up is well-regarded Paradise Valley Councilwoman Mary Hamway.  Her brand of character and communication is exactly what you want to have in the political arena.  She has consistently been a pro-tourism, pro-resort vote on her Town Council including the landmark decision to bring Mountain Shadows back to life as well as bringing the Ritz-Carlton to the community, a move that secures the town’s financial future.  We don’t always agree with Hamway.  Indeed, she’s rigid on preventing a medical marijuana dispensary in Paradise Valley even though it’s the law of the land and public support for the policy continues to increase since the measure’s narrow passage in 2010.  But her position shows spine.  And that’s something she and Arizona will need as the special interests come calling at the State Capitol.  Hamway narrowly lost her 2014 race for the same seat she is pursuing now.  We don’t expect the same outcome.  Indeed, Arizona would be the biggest loser were that to be the case. 

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Friends was one of the best and most successful television comedies of all time.  No one can say it didn’t have a great run.  From Phoebe Buffay to Chandler Bing the characters became a staple of American life.

Chandler, Arizona has also had a great run.  It is among Arizona’s most successful cities.  From Jay Tibshraeny to Jack Sellers it has been led by Mayors and members of the City Council who have largely made effective policy decisions.

385848 04: Actor Matthew Perry stars as Chandler Bing in NBC's comedy series "Friends." (Photo by Warner Bros. Television)

But just as Matthew Perry seemed askew in roles post-Friends so too was it odd to see stories like this one last year in which a well-connected developer and lobbyist conspired to sink a business’ aspirations in the Price Road Corridor. In any entitlement case there are typically good reasons to approve or reject an application but in this case the political games engineered by a nearby developer merely sinking to quash competition seemed more reminiscent of the dark hallways at the Arizona State Legislature than the home of Intel.

Fortunately, Chandler has a chance Thursday night to indicate it still is a city that’s headed in the right direction and that it rises above the politics of self-interest for the community interest.

On Thursday, a $500 million expansion of a successful, existing business park is on the docket.  Behind the scenes the same actors of a nearby, subsidized office building are again trying to undermine a competitor.  But this time they’re not just picking on an aspiring Korean businesswoman.  They are playing with fire.  For the project is quietly being considered by Fortune 500 companies surveying the Valley for new digs.  And speaking of surveys word is that one over the weekend of likely Chandler voters showed a whopping 85%-7% support for the project that could bring as many as 15,000 jobs and millions in new tax revenue for Chandler and local school district.  Proposition 123 may have squeaked by Tuesday night but public schools still need lots of help.  These are some of the reasons why the “Park Place” expansion is one of the most anticipated commercial developments in Arizona. 

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The Arizona Republic recently featured an impressive “land bridge” near Oro Valley, Arizona to facilitate highway crossings for wildlife and reduce car accidents with them.  Here is a link.

It prompted an idea.  Why not pursue something similar in Scottsdale for the McDowell Sonoran Preserve which is bisected by Dynamite Boulevard?

It would be far less costly than the proposed Desert Discovery Center (DDC), and enrich the refuge.

The DDC is a specious proposal that seems more supported by inertia than merit.  The burden is on proponents to generate the necessary public support for the project, as preserve advocates once did in early 1990s.  Currently, that doesn’t exist.  Nor does a compelling policy rationale for magnifying the development footprint at the proposed Gateway location.

The city’s construction of trailheads and exhibits at hiking points in the McDowells was so superbly done with so few footprints in God’s desert sands that they have effectively become a desert discovery center unto themselves.

Precious tax dollars should be used for completing the preserve and enhancing that which is already within via things like a land bridge.

Put another way, does anyone go to the Grand Canyon because of the visitor center?  No, they do so because of the majesty.  And so it will always be, and should be, with the McDowell Sonoran Preserve where tourism officials should understand that better marketing of God’s great gift will be far more impactful than marketing towards a redundant facility that seeks to interpret that which people can see for themselves, unadulterated.

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After losing the Republican nomination for the Arizona House of Representatives in 2014 Bob Littlefield found himself without a political title for the first time since 2002.

He couldn’t stand it.  So he’s running for Scottsdale Mayor against a former friend and ally. He’s running despite his wife also serving on the Scottsdale City Council at the same time. And he’s running despite being on every side of every issue from density and heights to the Desert Discovery Center to taking money from special interests and lobbyists.  littlefield at desk

So complete is Littlefield’s hypocrisy on just about every issue in Scottsdale that his acolytes appear to be resulting to rumor mongering in their quixotic quest to displace the popular and reform-oriented Mayor Lane.

The latest is suggesting that Lane would only serve two years if voters elected him for his final term as Mayor later this year because he wants to run for Treasurer?  Nice try.

That scenario is no more plausible than Littlefield being elected and then running anew for the Arizona House of Representatives.  But don’t take our word for it.  Lane’s commitment to his final term is easily confirmed.  Just call his office.  See what he says. 

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Scottsdale Mayor Jim Lane will be seeking a third and final term this August.  The finality has to do with the city’s term limits restriction. Three terms is all one gets to serve consecutively on the City Council or as Mayor.

Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton will not be seeking a third term, even though he would win easily.  That’s because Phoenix restricts the Mayor to serving but two terms.

Which is better policy?  2 or 3?  Or maybe a single six year term like Mexico’s President has?  Or no term limits at all.

It doesn’t matter who you are being an effective Mayor of a large city like Phoenix or a multi-faceted one like Scottsdale takes time.  Stanton has hit his stride.  Downtown Phoenix is one of the most talked about places in the Southwest.  He’s collaborating with Republicans on key education measures.  In short, Phoenix is a city on the move, like Scottsdale. 

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The proposed Desert Discovery Center is one of those ideas that’s been around a long time.  Like wine, some think this is cause to savor the idea further.  Once envisioned as something like an environmental Disneyland it has morphed into something more akin to a duplicative Desert Botanical Garden.

Some on the Scottsdale City Council like Linda Milhaven, Virginia Korte and Suzanne Klapp join many in the local tourism industry and strongly support the project. IMG_7265

Mayor Jim Lane has supported studying the matter further with no commitment to the final project, a position similar to Councilmembers David Smith and Guy Phillips.

Councilwoman Kathy Littlefield opposes the project even though her husband Bob, a failed state legislative candidate last cycle now running for Mayor, supported the project in 2008.

There’s support, opposition and caution but few would disagree the plan is controversial. 

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What a week for Scottsdale Mayor Jim Lane.  If there was ever a time he proved his mettle and wisdom on key issues, and why voters should keep him at the helm of Arizona’s best city, this was it.

*He voted for new, for-sale housing on McDowell Road, continuing the momentum for the corridor and next “it” area in the Valley;

*He’s leading Scottsdale’s effort to lend a boost to the Southwest Wildlife Conservation Center in far north Scottsdale as a neighbor’s effort try to shut down the refuge for mountain lions, bears, jaguars and the creatures and critters of Arizona.  Maricopa County will vote on the matter in early June. Lane has crafted a resolution for the City Council to vote on May 17th lending the city’s full weight to the county’s consideration. Scottsdale-Sign-547x198

*He said no to a renewed effort to get light rail into Scottsdale’s transportation plans.

*Top Valley business leader and Arizona Cardinals owner Michael Bidwill along with former NFL defensive end and current Scottsdale pastor Andre Wadsworth are hosting a fundraiser for Lane tonight.

*He joined with Litchfield Park’s Mayor to warn on today’s Arizona Republic editorial page about the dangers of allowing more casinos into Valley neighborhoods, like the loophole that was used to put one in Glendale. 

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Over the weekend Arizona Republic readers might have noticed a letter to the editor from David Ortega.  He waxed ineloquent, as history most often records his commentaries, about the inadequacies of Proposition 123.  There are good arguments on both sides of that issue, though many more in support.  This is not meant to be judgment on them.   Only on Ortega.

For he noticeably signed his letter “former Scottsdale City Councilman.” Dude, that was over a decade ago and we’re really not sure why such a title would qualify him any more than anyone else to opine about contemporary education policy.

What is it with people who can’t let go of such identity? It’s like the Grandpa who threw a no-hitter in high school and can’t stop telling the family about it every holiday dinner. 

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Just a couple of months back Scottsdale almost had a lot more than proverbial egg on its face.  It almost had a whole carton making its mug unrecognizable.

That’s when some on the Scottsdale City Council were actually considering not allowing the BASIS charter school to relocate and expand its presence on Shea Boulevard.  Fortunately, Mayor Lane, Suzanne Klapp and Linda Milhaven led the charge, and with assists from Governor Ducey and Attorney General Brnovich everyone else but Councilman Guy Phillips came along for the ride.

Imagine if the right decision wouldn’t have been made by Scottsdale and then these national school rankings by U.S. News & World Report came out? http://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/blog/business/2016/04/basis-charter-schools-take-top-spots-on-us-news.html 

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It’s always good to invoke Star Trek, especially when it comes to Bob Littlefield.  Because his campaign for Scottsdale Mayor seems to be from outer space.  And his campaign, in the unlikely event it is successful, would boldly take he and wife where no man has gone before:  a husband and wife team on the Scottsdale City Council.

We’re sure, no positive, absolutely certain that the Arizona Attorney General would NEVER, ever, never ever, come knocking at Scottsdale’s door because of open meeting laws violations.
littlefield at desk

But that’s not why we opine now.  It’s to reveal the game Bob Littlefield plays with south Scottsdale, and how he preys on their disenfranchisement only to stab them in the back to serve himself.

Take for example his ambulance chasing opposition to Entrada, the most important project proposed in south Scottsdale in years.  It would transform the ghost town of car dealerships on the northeast corner of 64th Street and McDowell into a terrific new gateway for the area with mixed-use development.  It’s the private sector finally responding, without government subsidy, to what many of us have been saying all along. South Scottsdale is a hidden jewel and the next neighborhoods in the Valley to go through a revitalizing “it” moment.  But that doesn’t serve Bob’s purpose.  He wants people to stay angry at the city because  it’s the only way he gains votes.  He certainly can’t win a contest of ideas or congeniality.  Indeed, he was the city councilperson when serving to refuse to sign a civility pledge. 

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Transforming the 32-acre Margaret Hance Park in central Phoenix to something more akin to Central Park is the best planning idea in the Valley today.  Read about it here. 

We hope the “Hance Park Conservancy” is one day regarded like the McDowell Sonoran Conservancy in Scottsdale.  There, volunteers and fundraisers alike act as stewards for one of the great preserves any city in America has created.

Both are in the spirit of the great Robert Moses who over decades let New York breathe a little easier with his expanse of recreational amenities and planning imagination.

We hope someone like him will emerge in Phoenix now to see that a great idea doesn’t sit on a drawing table.  It has happened before.  Not too long ago it was believed Indian School Park would emerge as that great, good Phoenix place.  But it certainly hasn’t evolved so. 

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There used to be a popular soap opera called As The World Turns.  The same title could apply to the prologue unfolding for the 2019 Mayor’s race in the City of Phoenix.

Due to term limits popular incumbent Greg Stanton will not be able to seek re-election.  But former City Councilman Tom Simplot has made it known he wants the job, as does embattled current Councilman Michael Nowakowski.

Last year Simplot sympathizers sought to damage Nowakowski over questions involving a downtown Phoenix land deal.  They viewed him as their greatest threat.  And while Nowakowski has recovered somewhat with news of downtown Phoenix’s grocery store unicorn finally landing, there’s no doubt his future prospects have been wounded.  But Simplot’s camp may regret his struggles. 

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By Let's Vote Yes for Arizona Schools

More than 20 school districts are waiting on approval of Prop 123

PHOENIX – For Arizona teachers, many of whom have not received a pay raise since before the Great Recession, passage of Proposition 123 means a needed and necessary pay raise this year.

So far, more than 20 Arizona school districts have released or passed provisional budgets that include pay raises for teachers. But those raises will evaporate in most communities without the guaranteed dollars that Proposition 123 provides.

“School boards across the state are struggling to attract and retain good, quality teachers,” said Tim Ogle, executive director of the Arizona School Boards Association. “School board members around Arizona have indicated that if Proposition 123 passes, teacher raises will be the first line item in their budgets and the first item on their agendas to pass. But, without the dollars that Proposition 123 brings, teachers will continue to receive unacceptably low pay for the work they’re doing to educate our kids and we will continue to see teachers flee Arizona for other states. At the end of the day, the only way to improve education in Arizona is with a high-quality teacher in the classroom.”

“Teacher pay in Arizona is embarrassingly low,” said Andrew Morrill, president of the Arizona Education Association. “Many, if not most, teachers in Arizona have gone six or seven years without even a nominal increase in their pay, hence our teacher shortage crisis. If Proposition 123 doesn’t pass, it’ll send a message to our teachers that we don’t appreciate or respect the work they’re doing to educate our kids, and they’ll continue leaving Arizona for higher paying teaching positions in other states or leaving the profession altogether. Prop 123 is the first step to get teachers in nearly all districts a raise this year, and keeping them in Arizona.”

“Arizona teachers have gone too long without getting the compensation they deserve,” said Sharon Harper, chairwoman of the Let’s Vote Yes for Arizona Schools, in support of Prop 123 campaign. “Let’s pass Proposition 123 so we can stem the tide of teachers leaving our schools and our state. The infusion of these dollars will get money in the classroom this year. If we do nothing, this will be the equivalent of a pay cut to teachers in Arizona.”

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By State Treasurer of Arizona Jeff DeWit

Proposition 123 is LESS money for schools and RAISES PROPERTY TAXES

I wish I could support Proposition 123.  I wish it was in the best interest of our schools, teachers, and taxpayers.  I wish it lived up to the claim of being “more money for schools without raising taxes.”  Unfortunately it is none of these things.

Anytime politicians tell you they have found a way to spend money without raising taxes, they are either raising debt or raiding a trust fund.  It is why our federal government owes $19 Trillion and our Social Security Trust Fund is depleted.  Our federal government has made false promises, and Arizona is now following suit.

Proposition 123 is a raid on the Schools’ Permanent Endowment Trust Fund which was established by Congress at Arizona’s statehood.  It is a pool of money intended to grow for the benefit of educating Arizona schoolchildren forever.  We can spend interest, but we are never to spend principle, as this plan does in a BIG way.  Proposition 123 violates this Congressional requirement, and if passed, a new multi-year lawsuit will likely begin, further delaying funding for our schools.

The politicians are saying that this Trust is “underperforming our schools.”  This is incorrect.  The amount we spend on schools from the Trust is now the highest in Arizona history, roughly $100 million a year, and should double about every seven years.  Voting NO on Proposition 123 keeps this money for its intended purpose, benefiting our schools forever.  Saying yes cuts the trust fund by over a third, costs our schools (and ultimately our taxpayers) Billions of dollars, keeps teacher pay at 50th in the country, raises property taxes, and creates a huge fiscal cliff in ten years that will hit hardworking taxpayers.

Let me say part of that again.  Right now Arizona is 50th in the country in teacher pay.  If Prop 123 passes, and the trust fund is raided, and when property taxes increase, we will still be 50th in the country in teacher pay!  As the Arizona Republic has pointed out, this is merely a "scam" on the voters to make them think that this is free money, when in reality it comes at a very high price to our children, teachers, and taxpayers.  Read here: http://www.azcentral.com/story/opinion/op-ed/ej-montini/2016/04/18/montini-gov-doug-ducey-league-of-women-voters-proposition-123-arizona-legislature-state-land-trust/83157214/ 

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Fred DuVal, the 2014 Democratic nominee for Governor, just endorsed Proposition 123.

Read his statement, here.

He is standing shoulder to shoulder with Governor Ducey and thousands of parents and educators to put our kids and teachers first. And we've got an new TV ad to prove it. Watch the video here.

Mr. DuVal and Governor Ducey don't always agree but they agree Prop 123 is a necessary first step towards improving Arizona's public schools.

Prop 123 is a perfect example of what Arizonans can accomplish when we work together.

They recognize just how important it is for us to inject $3.5 billion into public K-12 schools over the next 10 years without raising taxes.

We are proud that Democrats and Republicans are putting partisan politics aside and working together to get our schools the resources they need.

Join us, Fred DuVal, Governor Doug Ducey and countless others in supporting Proposition 123, and lend a hand to ensure this passes on May 17.

Thanks,

Team Prop 123

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By Dan Schweiker

Transportation has always been near and dear to my heart. I first experienced the valley's roads in 1978 when I arrived in Arizona in my un-air conditioned 1976 Honda Civic. A lot has changed since then, but one thing remains the same – we need an interconnected transportation system that moves people, goods, and services.

There is no doubt that our valley has grown. The number of freeways, streets, and transit options have increased and improved over time as well. I remember when the I-10 tunnel was completed with much fanfare and when the Loop 101 finally came to Scottsdale.

It was my honor to serve on the Maricopa Association of Governments Regional Transportation Committee in 2003 and 2004 as we worked on the Regional Transportation Plan and the extension of the 1985 half cent sales tax that built our transportation system. One of the things we realized early on is that we must take a multi-modal approach to transportation planning.

We realized that we must take into account the cost, available land, traffic patterns, growth, and interconnectivity into our planning. We learned that different areas had different needs and an interconnected plan could not be a "one size fits all" approach. We also adopted fundraising firewalls and audit measures to ensure fiscal responsibility. The result was the passage of Proposition 400 in 2004 which is still improving transportation across the region.

In Scottsdale, the Transportation Commission has released a draft of their Transportation Master Plan. It is a comprehensive proposal that will help strengthen our city's transportation policies and improve connectivity for our future. The Scottsdale City Council is meeting on April 12 in a study session to review the plan. 

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PHOENIX — Chandler Mayor Jay Tibshraeny today endorsed Proposition 123 citing the resources it will provide teachers and students throughout the next 10 years.

The Joint Legislative Budget Committee (JLBC) estimates that Chandler Unified School District will receive more than $9 million this year alone if Prop 123 passes. 

"I'm supporting Prop 123 because it's going to provide our schools, teachers and students with stability and support for the next decade," Mayor Tibshraeny said. "It will put billions of dollars into Arizona’s K-12 public education system over the next decade without raising taxes. It's prudent, fiscally responsible, and will help our teachers and students succeed in the classroom. Join me and vote YES on May 17."

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by Paul Babeu

Have you seen the latest poll?

It has us up big in Arizona's 1st Congressional District.35% of voters have rallied behind me, and our campaign, which has given us a 27-point lead.

This is all great news, and wouldn't be possible without you and all of your help.

The liberals in Arizona want no part of facing me in November, and they'll be throwing money at this race to stop us.

We're not going to let that happen.

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