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By Team Ducey

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Governor Ducey has repeatedly called for an Obamacare replacement that works for Arizonans.Last week, he discussed with The Washington Examiner how Congress should move forward replacing the Affordable Care Act.

Here are a few highlights:

  • "We want flexibility to adapt healthcare regulations that reflect what our states' citizens need."
  • "We want to ensure that the rug isn't pulled out from under people who need help and access to healthcare." That includes people with pre-existing conditions, who need insurance coverage just like everyone else.
  • "And we want to get it right the first time without inflicting all the trauma that came along with Obamacare. Congressional leadership and [Health and Human Services] Secretary [Tom] Price are listening, and that alone is a vast improvement. We have a good framework to continue the conversation and move forward."
  • Ducey says that a fix "won't happen overnight," but he is unwavering on a few points, namely that, "the taxes, mandates and federal control that comprise Obamacare should be repealed as quickly as possible, and the necessary elements of a healthcare plan that puts patients first and ensures the broadest possible access to quality healthcare should replace them."

Read the full interview online 

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A community spawned by the likes of William Rehnquist, Sandra Day O’Connor and Barry Goldwater is bound to be something special.  But a quick review of the tony township’s current in-box isn’t just special, it’s extraordinary.

*A new version of the beloved Mountain Shadows hotel is set to open March 7th, along with an equally loved “Short Course,” the renamed links next door. IMG_4155

*The Ritz-Carlton is moving ground further east on Lincoln, promising yet more luxury and more resort and residential choice, not to mention a huge new influx of tax revenue for town coffers.

*And then there is the recently announced expansion of the best small hotel in Arizona one of the best in America, The Sanctuary Resort.  The property is the embodiment of all that is right with Paradise Valley.  Beautiful views.  Sensitive footprint.  Remarkable setting.  Successful.  Distinct.

Times are so good in Paradise Valley that Cullum Homes, the metropolitan area’s #1 Custom Home Builder as ranked by the Phoenix Business Journal, is having the biggest party in town tomorrow to showcase its impressive The Village at Mountain Shadows.  The aptly named “7Cs Party” will host hundreds on site and feature caviar, cigars, cars, champagne, couture, car bars and the people responsible, Rod & Kim Cullum.  

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Yesterday was Scottsdale Mayor Jim Lane’s birthday.  It was also his annual State of the City address, attended by a record 460 people.

That’s a testament to his leadership, and the landslide election victory he had in November.  lane portrait

But the most surprising part of his speech wasn’t his dedicatory remarks about the “best city in America,” it was in the way he concluded his speech.  He did so with two forceful pronouncements that he intends to pursue a public vote on the controversial Desert Discovery Center as well as one to create a hybrid district system.  Under this proposal Scottsdale would see its six at-large council seats shrink to three with others being elected from a specific southern, central and northern district.  The three other councilmembers would continue to be elected at large, as would the Mayor.

On the heels of presiding over the best candidate campaign in Scottsdale since Robert Pettycrew’s in 1994, and after smashing nemesis Bob Littlefield, it would be easy for Lane to forget some of these key planks of his re-election campaign.  After all, it’s his last term, leaving him unencumbered.  But that’s not the kind of person he is.  

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Partnership between ASU, Scottsdale's Desert Discovery Center to produce research, exhibits about local environment

There's nothing new about Arizona residents looking for sustainable ways to live in the desert, but a recent United Nations report has made the matter a worldwide concern.

Because of climate change, the UN says that by 2030 almost half of the global population will be living in "areas of high water stress," and that without intervention as many as 700 million people could find themselves displaced.

Enter ASU and its partnership with Scottsdale's future Desert Discovery Center, aimed at creating an expansive research center to teach "a global audience to value, thrive in and conserve desert environments."

"When people think of research they think of a classroom," said Sam Campana, executive director of the center and former Scottsdale mayor. "It's our goal not to have a classroom, but a living laboratory where people are out doing work that is important to those who live here and to anyone in an arid environment."

Aside from research, the center will have a public face, and ASU has been working with design firm Thinc to create a series of exhibits to address "what I can see, what I can't see and what does all of it mean?" Campana said. In total, it will create an experience that shows how we can be more in tune with our environment.

Thinc, according to its website, has become known for a "holistic approach" that "combines great design and execution with broad insight into the organizational, cultural and physical contexts surrounding a project." The firm has worked with museums, science centers, zoosand aquariums.

The center's research will come as the global population grows "mainly in regions that are already experiencing water stress and in areas with limited access to safe drinking water," according to the UN in a 2014 study.

Research collaborations could include water quality, use and supply, as well as climate-change adaptation and urbanization.

Other areas of focus will include soil-crust research, desert species, the intersection of open-space preserves and people.

"There are things going on in the desert that are in the deep in the crust, and they're teeming with life," said Duke Reiter, executive director of University City Exchange. "But without this research and a sophisticated guide, at both at a macro and micro scale, it would be impossible to see. Only the university could bring this component."

Researchers, brought in by ASU, will study desert-life sustainability, "an important step in preserving and understanding this land," said Duke Reiter, whose exchange tracks university's academic and research assets to apply them "for the greater good."

Desert Discovery Center leaders are clearing hurdles as they await approval from the city of Scottsdale.

"If you look at ASU's design's aspirations, this university takes its commitment to their community, applied research and sustainability very seriously," Reiter said, "which is what makes this is a great venue and leaves no reason for us to not be involved in this."

 

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By Scottsdale Councilmember Virginia Korte

Last week we took the first significant step in solving our city’s infrastructure issues.virginiakorte_bio

Mayor Lane appointed me and Councilmembers Guy Phillips and David Smith to a new Council Capital Improvement Project Subcommittee.  The three us will be officially confirmed at the Council meeting on Tuesday, February 21st.

Recently, the city staff presented more than 40 capital improvement projects for the Council’s consideration.  The total cost of the projects is estimated to be $84 million. That is a lot of money, and, quite candidly, it is going to be a challenge finding the funding for those projects.  And this is the “tip” of the proverbial iceberg with our growing needs for reinvestment in the city’s infrastructure. It will take a combination of several different options to pay for all the projects over time. 

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There are gadflies at City Halls.  Every town or city has one, two or more. And then there are gadflies.  Like big gad, horse flies.  They don’t come any uglier or smellier than Mark Stuart in Scottsdale.

It’s not that he’s anti-establishment.  Nothing much wrong with that.   It’s that he’s in La La Land.  But his music isn’t pretty.  And typically lands in the dark, conspiratorial realm of the Art Bell coin.

And it’s not that he’s anti-Desert Discovery Center.  So are we.

But as he approached the podium during a Scottsdale City Council meeting on Tuesday night his intentions were clear, and in violation of the law.

One cannot use government resources to proselytize about a political campaign.  And that’s exactly what Stuart was attempting to do at a government run meeting, broadcast on public television.

He was warned not once, not twice but multiple times not to proceed by Mayor Jim Lane on the advice of the City Attorney.  Stuart ignored all polite requests by Lane.  Indeed, the mayor went to extraordinary lengths to explain that this law applies not just to those that wish to electioneer to oppose the Desert Discovery Center but to those that support it too.  To coin a Fox News phrase, Lane’s approach was fair and balanced.

But Stuart didn’t want to adhere to the law.  When given every chance to adhere he chose to disrupt.  The Scottsdale Police Department could not have been more courteous and conscientious in escorting him out of the Kiva.

For anyone to suggest that Stuart is a martyr or this was Lane again being disrespectful to the anti-DDC position is preposterous.  We either have laws, or we don’t.

The rhetorical thugs behind their DDC opposition, so thoroughly discredited by the city’s recent election results as well as insight such as this , don’t understand this.  But the responsible, reasonable majority of Scottsdalians do.  But don’t take our word for it, take Councilmembers Guy Phillips and Kathy Littlefield. Usual Stuart sympathizers on matters, they didn’t raise a finger or word to aid Stuart.  Because even they knew no martyr was in their presence, just a goofy gadfly.

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One of the great Scottsdale stories of 2016 was the undeniable vibe that southern Scottsdale and her neighborhoods were an area on the move.

Its strengths have long been known – proximity to Scottsdale’s thriving downtown and nearby freeways, a surging SkySong, new breweries – and the marketplace in the form of new families and residents started to respond.

Mayor Jim Lane put a profound emphasis during his 2016 re-election on this turnaround.  Here again the marketplace responded, voting to re-elect him in the southern city by wider margins than 2012.

But to continue the resurgence a critical part of the area must be addressed:  public schools.  It’s a fair question to ask if improvements aren’t made can southern Scottsdale continue its revitalization?  Yes, charter schools can step in to address some voids.  But ultimately it’s up to the backbone of the public education system to deliver, or not.  A case in point is central Phoenix and the Madison school district.  There, good schools equated to more families which in turn has created a mecca of cool and culinary where that didn’t exist previously.

That’s why it’s so gratifying to see south Scottsdale’s high school, Coronado, asking for help.  CORONADO SUCCESS A COMMUNITY PRODUCT.  And that ASU and the Scottsdale Charros have stepped up to the challenge should be applauded.

The Scottsdale Unified School District, of which Coronado is a part, has a relatively new leader, Denise Birdwell.  The essence of leadership isn’t just to find a way through or around walls when necessary.  It’s also being able to recognize that outside voices and resources may be necessary to scaling them and solving problems.  This isn’t a matter of not being too proud to beg.  It’s one of Birdwell being prideful and mindful of her position, seeking new ways of wisdom to students are successful not squandered.

We wish them all good luck.

If and when these capable leaders turn Coronado’s challenges into opportunities it won’t only be good news for the young minds there, it will be a catalyst to continue SoSco’s upward trajectory.

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Next Wednesday, City Council will be voting on a request to make Phoenix a Sanctuary City. I have and will continue to oppose this.

You hear many politicians make big promises about Phoenix becoming a Sanctuary City, but they are afraid to go on record and vote. That is why I believe this vote should happen.

Instead, I predict City staff will find a way to kill the vote before it takes place, so that those same politicians won’t have to put their money where their mouth is. Well, I’m not afraid of a vote. I will always vote NO to Phoenix becoming a Sanctuary City.

For more updates, click here and “Like” to follow my Facebook page.

Sal DiCiccio
Phoenix City Council
District 6

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By Sal DiCiccio
Phoenix City Council District 6

Phoenix City Council will vote on a request for Sanctuary City status on February 15th at a formal council meeting.

I am firmly opposed to the effort to make Phoenix a Sanctuary City. I don't believe any local government should be able to pick and choose the laws they want to enforce. Additionally, I believe such a move would be illegal and would put our officers in the unethical position of having to ignore their oath to uphold state and federal laws.

Below is the press release from the City of Phoenix regarding today's Sanctuary City developments: Read the Full Release

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Plans are underway to tap the further potential of the Scottsdale Civic Center Mall.  Click here for more info. This is smart planning by city staff and Mayor Jim Lane and the City Council.

But these plans should not languish.  They should be funded as soon as they’re completed.

Home to the Scottsdale Culinary Festival, arts festivals, Sunday concerts and souls that are enhanced every time they walk one of the city’s great municipal creations, the area can and should be more to help downtown.

With downtown Phoenix, Salt River Fields, a resurgent WestWorld, Tempe Town Lake and even Glendale seizing more festivals and special events Old Town needs an enhanced events venue.  

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