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By Byron York
Washington Examiner

In 2008, both Democrat Barack Obama and Republican John McCain supported defining marriage as the union of one man and one woman. In 2012, only Republican Mitt Romney supported traditional marriage, Obama having announced a change of heart six months before the election.

What about 2016? It's impossible to imagine a Democratic candidate not supporting the redefinition of marriage. As for Republicans, it's hard to see a gay-marriage-supporting candidate make it through the GOP primaries. But it is possible to imagine a Republican nominee who finds a softer way to oppose gay marriage without alienating either his party's older voters, who continue to overwhelmingly disapprove, or the millions of Americans who now support same-sex unions?

While an overwhelming majority of Democrats (69 percent) approve of gay marriage, just 39 percent of Republicans do, according to a Pew survey released this month. But Pew found that 61 percent of Republicans aged 18-29 approve of gay marriage, and 43 percent of those aged 30-49 approve. How will Republican candidates talk to them? A hint came this week, not from a politician, but from a leading evangelical.

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It has been said that you can’t choose your family, but you can choose your friends. That’s why so many people say it is unfair to judge someone by what a family member does. On the other hand, it is also why so many people look long and hard at the advisers and staff members that elected officials hire.

When Congresswoman Kyrsten Sinema hired an illegal alien who was fortunate enough to be granted deferred action through President Obama’s DACA program, she was making a point. When House Speaker John Boehner hired an advisor who led John McCain’s push for amnesty, it too sent a message.

Perhaps that is why Arizona politicos pay so much attention to the various hires made by the candidates running for Governor, and who is supporting whom at this early stage?

Recently, conservatives got some bad news from Doug Ducey’s campaign in the form of an email touting endorsements from Sal DiCiccio and Trent Franks. Don’t get us wrong, DiCiccio and Franks are great endorsements. Conservatives probably loved hearing about those two. But the email was signed by Ducey’s new Political Director Anson Clarkson. Yes, the same Anson Clarkson who ran the State Senate campaign of Rich Crandall, the State Senate’s leading liberal Republican until he abandoned his office to take a better paying job in Wyoming. The same Anson Clarkson whose career defining moment was working with Arizona’s leading liberal and race-baiter Randy Parraz to take down Republican Senate President Russell Pearce and replace him with the liberal Republican Jerry Lewis.

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You may have heard me say before that in solving some of our greatest problems, I believe freedom and opportunity are the answer. Nowhere is this sentiment more clearly demonstrated than in the free enterprise system. It empowers individuals to earn their own success, however they define it for themselves. It is the antithesis of government handouts and overbearing social programs.

At its heart, the beauty of free enterprise is what drives many conservatives like me, which is why I am honored to have earned the endorsement of Arizona’s Free Enterprise Club PAC.

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Dear Friend,

I hope you are doing well!

I am pleased to announce that I have recently accepted an Of Counsel position with Ryley Carlock & Applewhite, Phoenix’s third largest law firm, to lead the firm's External Affairs & Government Relations practice. My practice will focus on providing private sector, public sector, and non-profit clients with government relations, external affairs, community relations, and legal consulting. From helping executive leadership teams build value-driven relationships with policy makers to developing strategic charitable giving and public relations programs, I will be applying my background in business, government and as a community volunteer to elevate dialogues, create relationships, drive relevancy, and generate resources for my clients.

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March 20, 2014

From Elect Mary Hamway

PHOENIX (Thursday, March 20, 2014) – Former Vice Mayor and Councilwoman for the Town of Paradise Valley Mary Hamway announced the endorsements from five Republican council members in her bid for the Arizona House in District 28. Hamway released the endorsements from the following Republican council members:

•Vice Mayor Michael Collins

•Councilman Paul Dembow

•Councilman Dan Schweiker

•Councilman David Sherf

•Councilwoman Lisa Trueblood

These endorsements come after the Hamway campaign recently announced support from eight Republican Mayors.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Phoenix, AZ- March 26, 2014- Today, , Republican candidate for Arizona House of Representatives in Legislative District 28, received Arizona Corporation Commission Chairman Bob Stump's and Commissioner Brenda Burns' endorsements. shana

"Shawnna's knowledge and expertise in critical policy areas affecting the State of Arizona are hard to come by," stated Chairman Stump. "I know Shawnna has what it takes to be an effective legislator and a strong communicator. She is not only committed to understanding the big picture but is willing to delve into the weeds to craft sound public policy."

"Shawnna is a strong fiscal conservative who will prioritize the needs of Arizona. Watching her raise her two children I know how important education and the future of the state are to her," declared Commissioner Burns. “Shawnna is a quick study and eager to roll up her sleeves to find the right mix of pro-growth ideas benefiting the state. Arizona should be so lucky to have her willing to serve us in such a capacity."

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As Scottsdale voters were preparing to vote on city council candidates during the 2012 election the Arizona Republic rightfully called businesswoman and preservationist Virginia Korte one of the finest, most qualified people to seek the job. Korte is now the Vice Mayor of Scottsdale.

Such plaudits are appropriate for her friend, just across a town boundary, Paradise Valley Town Councilman Dan Schweiker.

Schweiker surprised many earlier today with a letter announcing his intent to resign from the Town Council July 3rd, and move to a smaller home in Scottsdale.schhweiker

It is major loss for the tony town, because he is a person that has helped achieve so many wins for it.

Years ago he cut through the acrimony that led to both beautification and flood control on Doubletree.

He has always been a strong supporter of photo radar.

He cast the deciding vote making Ed Winkler the Mayor, demonstrating his belief that no one should sit in that chair too long, as it belongs to the citizenry not the entrenched.

In between council stints he chaired the political campaign committee in support of a new Ritz-Carlton, not that his tourism bona fides ever needed to be burnished. On the council there has been no one more emphatic about the need for robust Paradise Valley resorts than Schweiker. He knows they not only provide great amenities for local residents, but revenues from them mean Paradise Valley remains one of the few municipalities in the state without a property tax.

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Every one has seen these union banners –  usually due to using non-organized labor.  They either elicit cheers or jeers, if anything at all, depending on one’s political perspective.

union pick 1

The owner of this Subaru dealership in Wichita came up with a brilliant response: coopt the protest for their own purposes. They added this sign:

union pick 2

Which resulted in this awesome message:

union pic 3

Free markets: Not just great for buying cars – also good for funny ideas.

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By Thomas Sowell

Recently former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice added her voice to those who have long been urging the Republican Party to reach out to black voters. Not only is that long overdue, what is also long overdue is putting some time -- and, above all, some serious thought -- into how to go about doing it.

Too many Republicans seem to think that the way to "reach out" is to offer blacks and other minorities what the Democrats are offering them. Some have even suggested that the channels to use are organizations like the NAACP and black "leaders" like Jesse Jackson -- that is, people tied irrevocably to the Democrats.

 Voters who want what the Democrats offer can get it from the Democrats. Why should they vote for Republicans who act like make-believe Democrats?

Yet there are issues where Republicans have a big advantage over Democrats -- if they will use that advantage. But an advantage that you don't use might as well not exist.

The issue on which Democrats are most vulnerable, and have the least room to maneuver, is school choice. Democrats are heavily in hock to the teachers' unions, who see public schools as places to guarantee jobs for teachers, regardless of what that means for the education of students.

There are some charter schools and private schools that have low-income minority youngsters equaling or exceeding national norms, despite the many ghetto public schools where most students are nowhere close to meeting those norms. Because teachers' unions oppose charter schools, most Democrats oppose them, including black Democrats up to and including President Barack Obama.

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From the New York Times:

The message implicit in the prizewinning documentaries “Detropia and “Searching for Sugar Man,” in Detroit’s declaration of bankruptcy in 2013 — in even a casual drive along Gratiot Avenue, past mile after mile of burned-out or boarded-up houses and stores — is that Detroit is in a pitiable state.

Yet when Toby Barlow reflects on Detroit, his adopted hometown, what he describes is potential, not pity — cheap real estate being the major reason.

“It’s fun to be here and be a part of those things that are re-emerging,” says Mr. Barlow, creative director at the advertising agency Team Detroit. “There are just a wealth of things that don’t exist in Detroit — and should.”

To create those things in the Motor City, Mr. Barlow, 48, who moved from New York to work on a Ford Motor account and stayed, has become an entrepreneur. He has opened a design store in Midtown, founded a nonprofit at Eastern Market that trains people in letterpress printing, and plans to open a restaurant in Corktown soon.

He has even found time to publish two novels since moving to Detroit from Brooklyn seven years ago. But his newest, headline-grabbing venture — with Sarah Cox, his partner in the project and another Brooklyn transplant — is one that aims to revitalize the city’s art community and potentially be a model for post-blight Detroit.

The project is called Write A House, and it is giving free houses to writers.

Starting in April, a prestigious panel of writers and poets will review applications from literary authors, poets and journalists; winners will receive free houses.

They need to live in the renovated structures two years, pay modest fees ($500 monthly) for insurance and taxes, make low-cost interior improvements and participate in Write A House’s blog and literary readings.

They must also be of modest income. “If you were making a good living as a writer, you probably weren’t going to want to move to Detroit,” Mr. Barlow jokes.

The first three houses, in ramshackle but salvageable shape, have already been acquired. They are clustered in the neighborhood north of Hamtramck called Banglatown, for its large Bangladeshi community. One house was donated; two were purchased for $1,000 each.

Over 12 weeks, starting in April, these three classic Detroit bungalows will undergo overhauls by construction trainees from the nonprofit Young Detroit Builders, supervised by a professional contractor. Each renovation will cost $35,000 to $70,000.

The first $30,500 for the renovation work was raised in December via the crowdfunding site Indiegogo; a second appeal is online at Fundly.com and a matching grant is expected.

While Write A House pursues tax status as a charitable organization to seek foundation grants for what Mr. Barlow calls a “realistic” goal of three or four houses a year, the Indiegogo effort has already spread the word. Hundreds of writers have contacted the group.

“We were very thrown, in a good way, by the positive responses,” Mr. Barlow says. He says some have come from South America, Northern Europe and India, “not to mention across town and in the suburbs, and places like New York, Pittsburgh and Texas.”

Mr. Barlow’s partner, Ms. Cox, 31, is a journalist and another Detroit booster. She works for the real estate website detroit.curbed.com and relocated from New York three years ago because “I found the cost of living there a little prohibitive.”

She, too, cites Detroit’s low-cost real estate and improving safety. “There’s more going on than just burned buildings and foreclosure,” Ms. Cox says. “It is a good and interesting place to start a business, and I have friends who have come from Brooklyn or Toronto or other places to start a business in Detroit.”

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